Green cabbage: A nutrient-rich, leafy green veggie for your dog

Published:
Leafy green cabbage

It may come as a surprise to you, but the humble green cabbage is a superfood and super good for your dog.

A new addition to our ingredient line-up thanks to its inclusion in our Roo Bowl, green cabbage packs a punch when it comes to being a nutrient-rich option for your pup. A cruciferous vegetable that has one of the highest levels of antioxidants of any veggie, green cabbage is high in fibre and a good source of sulforaphane, a sulphur-rich compound that is known for its powerful heart health benefits and cancer-fighting properties.

A real all-rounder

Significant research has been conducted to determine the health benefits of green cabbage. Cruciferous vegetables are high in antioxidants and has been shown to help reduce the incidence of cancers in dogs. These antioxidants include vitamins C and K, as well as carotenoids and flavonoids such as anthocyanins and kaempferol. This type of vegetable protects cells against oxidative damage, and may therefore prevent other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Green cabbage is completely safe for your dog to eat, but it’s important they chow down in moderation to avoid any digestive issues and gassiness.

Lyka: roll into good health

Locally sourced in Sydney, green cabbage is a simple but powerful superfood that can be found in our new Rip-Rollickin’ Roo Bowl. This recipe is ultra-low in fat, high in protein and easily digestible. Your pup will have a chow-chomping good time thanks to the delicious and nutritious ingredients that include green cabbage (of course!) as well as button mushrooms, raspberries, chia seeds and tomato. Are you ready to join the fresh dog food revolution?

Build a box

Need a sniff of approval?

Join the pack today with 30% off your first order.

Try out 6 different proteins before committing to a flexible meal plan that meets your dog’s taste preferences and needs.

Get started
A picture our range of Lyka meals

Related articles